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heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all that, we have saved in california tens of billions in energy efficiency. when i first adopted those, people reacted negatively. we pushed ahead. and now in california we have ab 32. signed by a republican actor turned governor. promoting something i pick up on and promote further. the number of people in silicon valley defended ab23 against -- ab32 against an onslaught of texas oil companies. we defend when they tried to block your business. california gets 50% of the venture capital. there is a lot going on
a community center in the western addition and we talk about educating and supporting and one of the things that comes it my mind off the top is really talking to the people that are doing the bullying and understanding hurt people hurt people, right? as we're talking about this, there are two pieces and i'm wondering how do you integrate, we all talk about the finances and making things happen, but one is the mental health piece, the part about understanding where it's coming from, talking about a culture or a community, that's what they are used to. you tell people not to do that but as a child all you've heard is negativity and you've been beat up on and they talk bad to you. it's not just from one workshop you are going to change the mindset, how do we understand the mentality. the other is understanding the online/offline. we had alonzo coming in and speaking to us, they don't understand the impact, it's not enough for me to say we're going to do a workshop or a campaign, a poster thing, it's really about how do we change the culture of a community and a people and it's not just a o
another fronting something that was taking away from the value. they need education. when you go through the first process there is a checklist as to what you should be bringing in if you're going to the hearing. >> thank you so much. thank you ms. nelson. next we have shawn ridgell. okay. next we have daniel hershkowitz. >> how do you do? >> how do you do. >> please ask me the same question at the end. i am a real estate attorney and arrested broker in san francisco. i have been here for half of my life, true in a couple of months. i have been a real estate attorney for the last 15 years here san francisco and for a few years in oakland. for the last 12 years i have worked primarily as a real estate broker. i have quite a bit of experience with the appraisal process. i am a homeowner here in san francisco. that is in true; i have been a renter for the last two months; for the previous 15 years, an owner of single-family homes and a few condos and also the landlord. i understand all of those perspectives. i also was the president and secretary depending on the year of homeowners
, deeply grounded in our education and how it has prepared us as women and the leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist in the movement, and they need to know about it. i'm working on the book, this book. i said well, can i help you, can i get it published and that is how this journey began. >> bernice, when did your mother began her activism? she was born in marion alabama? >> i ron ackley if you study history, three of the leading movement, ralph abernathy and my father all have lives in alabama. how ironic is that. my mother didn't know one leader after that. she no one was much younger but they didn't know, you know, that kind of stuff and it just brought it all together. and so, growing up there in rural alabama with a father who was an entrepreneur early on and he called lumber and he did open an assault mel by a white gentleman. the father's determination to stand up to justice and continue to move to really influenced her and that produced a lot of the leaders in the nation. missionaries came and educated the reactive and why am i here driven by the fact
representing a wide area of government agencies, law enforcement agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you. why don't we do that? why waste a
. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to
, seven and nine of the indian education act. she has moved beyond the limits of her duties for the families in her district. she spends time volunteers for all community functions that the alliance puts on. the families that she serves remember her fondly and all that she did for them. she offered her talents to powwows, food booths, graduations and dinners and let's watch a video on gwen stirrer. >> i am [inaudible] known as the keepers of the western door. they're on the western side of new york and they're the biggest of the tribes. i'm the one -- i'm the one that creeks that runs through our reservation now. indian community -- there was nothing in the beginning. for 20 years that i work in the school district helping the children understand that their heritage was important, and important to be proud of being indian, and so that gave them reasons to study harder and to be a better student and stay in school. where you come from is important and what your background is and your family, so we have to have indian education. i don't think i'm a hero. i just had a j
important. so i thought i'd mention that. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the a
of the commission. >> president carter appointed you. >> carter appointed me when i left his education, running education. yet in the department of education and i went back to teaching at the appointed me to the commission. >> at what point to become the the u.s. civil rights commission will become a permanent agency? >> after the first year when the reports that they did -- with the commission did was instead of sitting down and saying, okay. we are here as a safety valve and don't really -- they did some hearings. major power that the commission has, and a point this out in the book. to me it is the most important thing about the commission. does what it is supposed to do it will go out and listen to people that nobody else will listen to. problems, civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention, not just local people but the federal government. it would write letters, do all kinds. no one would pay any attention. the sole rights commission decided that first year it would go out and listen to these people and see what they had to say. they had the powe
of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particul
of linking education with worse force development. making the united states more economically competitive by investing in community colleges, by improving our education system and linking that with the business sector. if he can do that he can lead four years from now with a america with a better economy and much more well positioned for prosperity. >> i have to check in with the reporters around town. brooke baldwin. can you hear me? >> reporter: you hear correctly. i can barely hear myself speak. i'm a southern girl. it's my perfect place. they're playing a very significant song right now. this is simple plman. i was talking to them backstage. they say this is the one song they sing. they sing at concerts like this all the time. we have heroes in the room. our men and women in military. many of them in wheelchairs to my right who have made it out here. they are trying to move forward. the guys in the band say the song just resonates. neez men a these men and women are simple men and women. yourself missing out. >> you look absolutely the part in that dazzling outfit. let me move to anot
in terms of linking education with workforce development. making the united states more economically competitive in the 21st century global economy investing in community colleges, improving the education system and linking that with the business sector. if he can do that, he can leave four years from now with an america with a better economy and much more well positioned for prosperity in the 21st century. >> wait a moment. we have to check in with reporters around the town now. brooke baldwin at the red, white and blue ball. brooke, can you hear me? you are with military leaders and lynyrd skynyrd, i hear. >> you hear correctly, my friend. i can barely hear myself speak and so glad you came to me. i don't know if you can hear. i'm a southern girl. i'm in my perfect place hearing the southern rock band lynyrd skynyrd. playing a significant song. this is "simple man." i was talking to them backstage and they said they sing at concerts all the time. that is hero's red, white and ball here in washington. the men and women of military, many of these guys just in wheelchairs to my right
of the funds to come to the city and council to defray the costs and acts of service and to educate small businesses on action steps to achieve accessibility compliance. dbi is meeting with the office of small business to determine the most appropriate use of these very limited funds. and which are the result of passage of senate bill, 1186 by the state legislature last september so that is something that is important to us based on the conversations in the past. >> acting director, director and i have recently met with the office of small business to executive director to discuss ongoing compliance issues around the number of vacant commercial storefronts. >> it does not appear that it could effectively address, vacant storefronts especially in buildings otherwise occupied. we remain available for follow up discussions on these issues. these conversations are helpful and we obviously can't accomplish the goals all of the time. but at least the communication we can come up with creative ways of assisting these issues to the department. >> dbi along with other departments is participating
to make a motion to divide the question. one, about the 1.1 million dollars about the public education enrichment fund and separately 843 million dollars from the general fund's stays federal reserve. initially i wanted us to divide the file entirely to send two files to the mayor who indicated that he would sign it so that we could get the 1.1 million to the school district immediately. >> motion to divide is not debatable. will consider those two items. supervisor mar. >> i want to support the whole -- supplemental brought by supervisor kim. i want to speak to the accountability of the school district. another the former school board president, norman yee and others have successfully brought the school district to a stronger financial state. they have achieved a perfect score in the recent audit; never before has any governmental agency seen that. it's a good testament to the work that the former president of the school board jay kim and our colleague norman yee have done. also the sfusd action plan to presented the plan at the previous financial meeting showed that it was mone
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
. that there is one more thing. so the educational system in college. i think there should be services for financial aid for individuals with disabilities. as you are abruptly thrown into the world with lots of action going on and it's a very hard transition. particularly if you are furthering your education, for folks with disabilities, particularly with financial aid. this is why most individuals don't go to college. that is all, thank you. >> thank you. are there any council members who have a comment or question? go ahead idell. >> thank you. thank you everyone for coming out here today. i have to apologize, i have been sick, so i didn't even know that the meeting would have happened. i would have had a lot more people here. sorry about that, but the next time we do this, which i know this won't be last one, it will be go. what i wanted to say is having access -- she was talking about the internet -- having cable or something at a reasonable price. we have people with disabilities and seniors just siting this their house just looking at wall because they cannot afford cable or a telephone
year of the washington. you want to start an interesting conversation. ask this well-educated well- connected crowd. what was more important, the first time barack obama was elected. first african american president or the fact that he was just real. let's go inside. i want to tell you some of what they had to say. >> reporter: the historic theater was jumping on stage with the kind of jazz they want to improve. >> i want them to leave the president alone. >> reporter: but outside the upscale gathering waited. >> they have a little more power. >> they have supported president barack obama a second time. and their money, their campaign, and their votes. >> mitch mcconnell said he would be a one-term president. four years ago a line of symbolism and it was. a lot of people are telling us tonight they are looking for programs from the president from this point on. >> on gun controls, barack knows what to do. >> i'd like to see him focus more on education. everything starts with education. >> reporter: they are headlining this private inaugural party. planning to be here well into the
of working on education issues for a very long time, i have come to realize that the civil rights laws are the most, have been historically the most sorely underutilized tools for change. it is in the context of civil rights as we talked about with the lgbt community. we have also, as tom mentioned, seen and we were reading about all too frequently a kind of bullying and harassment for students of certain religious groups. in our guidance we also made it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this
and to be part of the discussion. we've got federal, state and local policy makers, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from
illicit drug use is a multilayered approachh -a focus on education and prevennion.-treat drugs and issue not just aacriminall justice oncern.-law enforcement focus remains o the national institute on drug pbuse show tte road ahead is tough. illicit drug use in america has been creepinn up. 22 and a half million americans, 8 point 7 percent, used or abuued illicit ddugs in 2011...up four tenths of a pprcenttii a decade. most of that increase comes from &pmarijuana use...the drug of choice for teens."tte one pprticular thing that worries me the most is the youth use of marijuana. studyyafter study shows ittcan have a number significant healtt and mentaa hheltt impacts particularly on developing wheeler, it's not your father's marijuana. the main psychoactive ingredientathc in the old days."we keep as - thinkkng that marijuann is like three percent, five percent. the population that ccll it wake and bake. some of these clients wakeeup eveey morning and they go smoke aa the admiiistration's approach is to curb use before it beccmee abuse. dr. daniell palord is part of a program doing ju
work within our community to educate people about issues of humanitarian aid and world need. and as we raise our community's consciousness, we fund and we raise funds to support relief efforts all around the world. our projects focus on, education, hunger, safe drinking water, and disaster relief, and all kinds of different ways of helping people. we have ongoing projects in cambodia, haiti, and south africa and helping out in areas just as the tsunami in south east asia and the earthquake and tsunami in japan and last year, and during hurricane katrina we tributed one mill object pounds of food aid. [ applause ] >> and all of that is coming from the lgbt and friends community. so we work as ambassadors for our community and we help change people's minds and hearts about who we are and what we care about. besides providing humanitarian aid, we try to inspire hope in all of our projects and we have found that hope is really just as important as aid, if not more so. and we have worked with a lot of communities in desperate situations arounded world and we found that providing a little bi
helper can help you back. and with box tops for education on every box, it helps you help your school. so you're doing good, just by making dinner. hamburger helper. available at walmart. i just finished a bowl of your light chicken pot pie soup and it was so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. >> ama: nasa scientists say they made a discovery on mars. they have found white veins packed with minerals at the bottom of a massive crater. they say it's evidence of an ancient stream bed during a wetter time. scientists can look at the minerals to help determine how the environment changed into current dusty landscape. >> facebook wants to expand menlo park headquarters but it can't make any changes until city officials agree. it's expected to be considered by the city council on tuesday. the report under current terms facebook would pay the city $1.5 million over the next ten years. company also would have to restrict the number of vehicles going in and out of
with education. this is a promise lives lost. to be open to all possibilities. there is no agenda other than to make our community a safer and better place. this is a promise. to have a conversation on all the issues. conversations where listening is as important as speaking. conversations were even those with the most opposing views can debate and goodwill. this is a promise. to turn the conversations to action things must change. this is a time. this is a promise. we make to our precious children because each human life is filled with promise and we continue to be filled with unbearable pain; we choose love, belief, hope instead of anger. this is a promise. to make everything in our part not as a place with victims but a place where real change can be made. our hearts are broken. our spirits are not. this is a promise. as a parent i have never had anything hit so close to home as it did the other day. the second item is a hearing at a different vein to discuss and have it public and open dialogue about the cleanliness of our streets and open spaces here in san francisco. recently media ou
to the hearing process. we use it as an opportunity to educate the public even when i'm a rule against them i try to give them an explanation about why i have reached that conclusion and what they might do to obtain assistance. i know the last hearing there was a woman who spoke chinese. and she brought a flyer. it was written in chinese. she really needed assistance. i was able to communicate with them. next time she should bring an interpreter or someone who can help her through the communication process. >> i assume we also provide interpretation if requested in advance? >> don -- would be the person to respond. >> maybe donna can address that after we hear from the applicant. it is very important that we provide interpreters ourselves. >>that has been an issue. >> especially for language involved. >> thank you very much. >>thank you. >>next we have ms. louisa mendoza. >> good afternoon to the panel ladies and gentlemen. my name is louisa mendoza, resident of san francisco for over 25 years. from south america via the caribbean. i am seeking a permanent appointment. also substituting in the bo
floor. that print studio is nationally known for its artwork and its educational programs. for the youth guidance center, i just spoke about the presentation that we did for the ada transition plan. we're requesting $400,000. that is to do all the design and architectural construction drawings and obtain building permits for a $3 million project to be funded in 2014-2015. we are also requesting some funds for miscellaneous general services projects. in our master planning efforts that go on to support all of these projects, that is at the level of $400,000. and let's see, we do have some other funding requests in 2014-15. under the plan, we must plan for a two-year cycle of budget requests. and also a ten-year capital plan request. so we're looking at sun setting our funding in 2015. and it will take us through 2015, almost all the way through that year to complete the construction of all of our projects. these funding requests are separate from curb ramp and sidewalk ada transition plan funding projects. all right? so these are the architectural buildings. and that is the end of my re
development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized, individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. the jane henson foundation. and the corporation for public broadcasting. welcome, i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. final preparations are underway in washington, d.c., for the second inauguration of barack obama, taking place on monday, martin luther king, jr. day. the benediction will now be given by the reverend luis leon of st. john's episcopal church, where the obamas sometimes attend services. leon replaces evangelical pastor louie giglio, who bowed out after controversy erupted over a sermon he gave in the 1990s condemning homosexuality. myrlie evers-williams, widow of murdered civil rights leader medgar evers, will deliver the invocation and the brooklyn tabernacle choir will sing. >>> this week, many religious groups praised president obama's newly announced measures to try to reduce gun violence, particularly his call for mandatory background checks and a ban on assault weapo
of education decision. as people like barbara johns, the high school student that led a walkout of the segregated school because of protesting in the interior education. that's in 1951 we don't even know their names anymore even with rosa parks and montgomery. there were two other teenagers who did the same thing. as of this resistance, largely among the young people. >> host: on both sides is and it? >> guest: definitely. when you talk about south africa we all remember nelson mandela it was the students and others that revised the movement that was more abundant in the late 60's. >> host: he did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. tell that story about the crusade. >> guest: he was at a crucial point in birmingham. he gave a direction in march and millions of people followed him, completely wrong. from montgomery which came didn't initiate through birmingham, king is a leader but only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain the movement but that point in april of 1963 all of the people that are adults that are looking to get arrested had already been
education. that's my $0.2 more. thank you for joining us. over its record to show. have a great night and will see right back here next week. ♪ says. ♪ lou: good evening, everybody. breaking news at this hour. the associated press reported that one american was the standoff between a terrorist group in this arid desert. at least 20 of the original 132 hostages taken at the bp gas plant still missing. confirming that americans are among the hostages being held refusing to put a number on how many. the leader of the terrorist group signaling that at least two americans are among those hostages, and he is offering to freedom in exchange for the release of the world trade center bomber, the so-called blind sheik. a pakistan scientist jailed for trying to kill american soldiers in afghanistan. the state department flatly denying the request. >> the united states does not negotiate with terrorists said. >> all say it again. the united states does not negotiate with terrorists. >> we do not negotiate with terrorists. we are obviously in consultations. lou: the problem with that statement
vs. board of education decision killing of civil-rights workers, the young high-school student who led a walkout to protest against fifth inferior education. 1951. many people we don't even know there names or other teenagers who did the same thing. so the resistance largely among young people. >> definitely when you talk about south africa, we all remember nelson mandela who was in a prison cell. for others to revived a movement in the early '70s and the late '60s. >> host: talking about children, james did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. >> guest: king was at a crucial point* in birmingham with millions of people across the country followed him. from montgomery which king did not initiate, through birmingham, king is a leader in search of a following. only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain a movement the dow reached a crucial point* in 1963 all those who were adults who were willing to get arrested already had been arrested. he writes his letter from the birmingham jail. it was not clear he bush win in birmingham. if he lost there would be no m
to this facility. we thought it would coincide with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program changed over the years? how has the program -- what can the public has an artist engage with? >> for the most part, we worked with metal and wood, what you would expect from a program like ours. over the years, we tried to include artists and all types of mediums. conceptual artists, at installation, photographers, videographers. >> that has really expanded the program out. it is becoming so dynamic right now with your vision of interesting artists in gauging here. why would an artist when to come here? >> mainly, access to the materials. we also give them a lot of support. when they start, it is an empty studio. they go out to the public area and -- we call it the big store. they go out shopping, take the materials that, and get to work. it is kind of like a reprieve, so they can really focus on their body of work. >> when you are talking about recology, do you have the only sculpture garden at
in it, educate themselves better for it i try hard to make the book the festival. i have policy recommendations. >> where did it all start for you. ? where is your birth town? >> kansas. there is a symmetry with my personality. >> when did you know you would be an independent person? >> i think i have always been. i grew up in southeast kansas. independence is a small town. people always had to be a bit scrappy. the roads have improved a little bit since i have moved away. it is somewhat reflective of where i grew up. my parents were depression-era kids. they were very poor. they had a lot of strength. it is probably a personality trait i have had throughout my life. >> where did you go to college? >> cambridge university. a product of public schools all the way through. a public-school education served me well. it saddens me because i think it is basic to what america is about to give everybody a basic shot and have an opportunity. it starts with public education. christ, and the total years have you worked in government? >> a lot. since 1981, really. i was a civil rights attor
's about education, about research and development, it's about controlling our energy future. all of these are part of the equation. and we can't just do one piece of it, and we can't let that piece prevent us or become a smoke screen for not acting on the others. so that is the challenge. how do you put that puzzle together, move forward in a balanced way, so we're funding those kinds of priorities that we need to grow? >> it's interesting, doris, as you look at the historical sweep as well. here is a very toxic atmosphere in washington. a carryover of, you know, difficult debates. and the president who's popular, has a unified party, but also seems reluctant to go out on a limb on some big areas where he thinks he's not going to get much cooperation from republicans. >> i'm not sure that's true. i think gun control. he came out with sweeping proposals. i mean, that's certainly out on a limb. you're not going to get a lot of support perhaps from republicans. but his idea, i think, is that if you educate the country -- you know, when he talked to you, he mentioned lincoln's quote.
of work two years, three, even four. they're college-educated professionals in their 40s or 50s, people who thought their company would take them all the way to retirement. vernon? >> i was very angry. i was very bitter. i was fed up with society, the corporate world, the lies, deceit, the greed. >> they don't look it, but they have fallen out of the middle class, turned in cars, gone on food stamps, taken kids out of college, and faced foreclosure. now, they've pinned their last hopes on joe carbone. >> the word "carnage" is a strong word, but i can't think of a better word in this case. and i-- what aggravates me is that there isn't outrage. we ought to be angry. we ought to be giving every moment of our time figuring out how we're gonna restore for them the american dream. >> joe carbone is president of something called the workplace. it's the state unemployment office in southwest connecticut where people get job training and placement help. carbone has a reputation for innovative job programs, but he has never seen so many people out of work so long. >> there is no comparison to be
force in trying to educate americans not only of the constitutional rights but how to properly on and maintain the support. lou: governor chris christie, the nra and, talking about the president's children deserve security, and so the around. he call that repugnant, deplorable. he went on. how do you think you will react to that ad by the gun control advocates? >> we will see if he steps forward and condemns that. i did not think the nra ad was a smart move. i thought that the substantive case then made was virtually indisputable. it is the case that there is a double standard. we can debate whether the president deserves to have a double standard, particularly with respect to the secret service. but having said that, the ad in my view may president obama a sympathetic figure in the one way that they did not want to make a sympathetic. lou: you can argue that they could have done a better -- you can argue lots of things, but the fact that they point out very specifically that there is a double standard. the nra was not saying that he did not deserve nor his children deserve tha
. it was in a book about teaching kids how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to their kids about a difficult subject with him i don't run into. so that's where the format is an illustrated picture book for kids. as i got into the subject and started looking into train, which is relevant to some children's lives. their children but pickett, families involved in the oppressive policies to eradicate coca and it's a social or cultural issue. as i got deeper into the history of coca and specifically with relationships of the coca-cola company, origins from a medical marvel to the drug problem we have today, it got really complicated and so now it's a book for adults. i also started in coca with coffee because they wanted to do a comparison is not in that fascinated me with the way the drugs, plants change their perceptions over time for the cultural perceptions, the legal, social perceptions. as inspired by michael collins spoke about body of desire, where he talks about the history for different plants. when apples came to this country, they want the fleshy fruit
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
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